Interbike 2014: Rocky Mountain Altitude Carbon 27.5 Bike Review (150mm rear travel)

This was a good first bike to ride for the day as it was a solid bike all around. I would be really happy to have the Altitude as my personal ride.  The Altitude uses a modified Horst Link design (pivot in front of the rear wheel axle on the chainstay) with the axle dropped below the chainstay pivot to reduce the amount of bobbing when pedaling.

A key feature of the Altitude is the Ride-9 feature which allows adjustment of the bike’s geometry and shock rate. By moving the position of the rear shock, the head angle can vary from 66.6 degrees to 68.3 degrees and the seat angle between 73.6 degrees and 75.3 degrees. The bottom bracket also raises or lowers by 10 degrees. These adjustments can also vary the amount of leverage on the rear shock to better adapt to lighter and heavier riders.

 Climbing - 3 stars

The Altitude pedaled well, but didn't feel super snappy when laying down the power. 

Descending - 3 stars

Descending was solid and predictable.  The only thing the Altitude really lacked was a bit of immediacy in its steering and liveliness in its feel that the best bikes have. 

Cornering - 3 stars

Not exceptional in how it felt cornering, but completely predictable in feel. 

 

Rating Guide

5 stars - Absolutely outstanding

4 stars

3 stars - Solid performance, meets expectations

2 stars

1 star - Misses expectations by a wide margin

 Rocky Mountain Altitude (150 mm rear suspension travel)

Rocky Mountain Altitude (150 mm rear suspension travel)

 Ride-9 rear suspension adjustment

Ride-9 rear suspension adjustment

 

 Rear axle is dropped below chainstay pivot for better climbing performance.

Rear axle is dropped below chainstay pivot for better climbing performance.